Irresistible Read Alouds

Read Aloud Tips for Parents

  • Share your enjoyment of books with your child.
  • Talk over your reading.
  • Continue to read aloud to your child even after he or she reads independently.
  • Encourage your child to choose a book to read aloud to someone else.
  • Broaden your child’s horizons by helping to select from a wide range of subjects.
  • Encourage your child to read whatever he or she enjoys even if it appears to you to be too easy or too hard.
  • Let your child see your enjoyment of your own reading.

123 versus ABC
written and illustrated by Mike Boldt
(Harper)

Are the Dinosaurs Dead, Dad?
written by Julie Middleton
illustrated by Russell Ayto
(Peachtree)

The Boy Who Cried Bigfoot!
written and illustrated by Scott Magoon
(Simon & Schuster)

Bugs in My Hair!
written and illustrated by David Shannon
(Blue Sky Press)

Can’t Scare Me!
written and illustrated by Ashley Bryan
(Atheneum Books for Young Readers)

Chick-O-Saurus Rex
written by Lenore Jennewin
illustrated by Daniel Jennewin
(Simon & Schuster)

King for a Day
written by Rukhsana Khan
illustrated by Christiane Kromer
(Lee & Low Books)

The King of Little Things
written by Bil Lepp
illustrated by David T. Wenzel
(Peachtree)

Lucky Ducklings
written by Eva Moore
illustrated by Nancy Carpenter
(Orchard Books)

Nurse Clementine
written and illustrated by Simon James
(Candlewick)

The Silver Button
written and illustrated by Bob Graham
(Candlewick)

That Is Not a Good Idea!
written and illustrated by Mo Willems
(Balzer + Bray)

Tiger in My Soup
written by Kashmira Sheth
illustrated by Jeffrey Ebbeler
(Peachtree)

The Tree Lady
written by H. Joseph Hopkins
illustrated by Jill McElmurry
(Beach Lane Books)

Warning: Do Not Open This Book!
written by Adam Lehrhaupt
illustrated by Matthew Forsythe
(Simon & Schuster)

Whale Shines
written and illustrated by Fiona Robinson
(Abrams)

 

And the Winners Are….Caldecott Medal

Gold Medal

locomotive

Honor Books

flora flamingo

mr. wuffles

journeyThis year I found it hard to narrow my Caldecott Contenders to 20+ books.  This seemed to me to be “The Year of the Picture Book”; however, all four of the winners were on my Caldecott Contender list this year.  If had chosen the gold it would have gone to Flora the Flamingo.

If you haven’t had a chance to read any of the winners or the books I picked as Caldecott Contenders, stop by the library today.  They are on display and ready for checkout along the blue wall in the Picture Book Section. I purchased multiple copies of all of these books, so more patrons could enjoy these amazing books!

And the Winners Are…Newbery Award

Gold Medal Winner

flora and ulysses

  Newbery Honor Books

billy miller one came home doll bonespaperboyFour of the five winners were in my First Round of Newbery Contenders….I absolutely loved the books on my First Round List.  My favorite character of the year was Georgia Burkhardt in the book One Came Home.   I adored this book and had my fingers crossed, but wasn’t sure the judges would vote for it.  Had I been on the committee, I would have fought hard for One Came Home.  This was an historical/murder mystery that I couldn’t put down.   The most creative book of the year was a toss up for me…I couldn’t decide between Flora and Ulysses and A Tangle of Knots.  The Year of Billy Miller will keep fans of last year’s book Wonder with a good read in their hands.  This book will appeal to a wide range of readers, and I can see it becoming a mentor text or read aloud in many classrooms for years to come.  Just like Splendors and Glooms (2012), Doll Bones was one of those books that I appreciated for the writing, and felt it was a strong contender for a Newbery, but would have probably steered away from as a child because this genre would have kept me up at night.  On another note, Doll Bones is probably the most creative coming-of-age book I have ever read.  I thought that the historical context  Paperboy might be a reach for most elementary students;  I would recommend this book to students who have some background knowledge of the summer of 1959, the beginning of the civil rights movement and the segregated south.  The only book that I’m saddened to see didn’t make the final cut was A Tangle of Knots, although it didn’t receive a Newbery, I feel it is going to be a sure hit with readers who love quirky characters and have the patience to untangle a good plot.

Best Books of the Year 2013

book-wrap-two

What better gift to give than one that can be shared again and again?  If you’re looking for a great book for your child to read this winter break, I highly recommend the books on the lists below.

Guide Book to Gift Books (2013 update)

This is a 27 page annotated listing of books that would make great gifts for children of all ages and is issued by the highly reputable Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books.

2013 Books Buying Guide (Reading Rockets)

Lots of things go away quickly. But stories and books have sticking power and can be shared time and time again. Try a new story, revisit an old favorite. How about a story of fact or perhaps a fantasy? Stories can be read alone, together, aloud or quietly. Pick up a book for yourself and your favorite child this season.

ALA Notable Children’s Books 2013– nominees

ALSC Best Graphic Novels

ALSC – 2013 Notable Children’s Books

Amazon Best Books of the Year (Board Books)

Amazon Best Books of the Year (Children’s Picture Books)

Amazon Best Books of the Year (Chapter Books Ages 6-8)

Amazon Best Books of the Year (Fiction Ages 9-12)

Goodreads (picture books)

Goodreads (middle grade & children’s)

Kirkus Best Children’s Books of 2013

NPR’s Best Children’s Books of 2013

NY Times Notable Children’s Books of 2013

NY Times Best Illustrated Books of the Year

Publisher’s Weekly Best Children’s Books (Picture Books)

Publisher’s Weekly Best Children’s Books (Fiction Books)

Publisher’s Weekly Best Children’s Books (Nonfiction Books)

SB & F – Excellence in Science Books

School Library Journal – Best Picture Books

School Library Journal – Best Children’s Fiction

School Library Journal – Best Children’s Nonfiction

Society of Illustrator’s Best Books of the Year

"Reading in the Wild"

I am a big fan of Donalynn Miller.  Her book,  The Book Whisper, was not only inspiring, but affirmed my beliefs about independent reading when it came out a few years ago.

Donalynn Miller

From the Publisher: Reading in the Wild explores whether or not we are truly instilling lifelong reading habits in our students and provides practical strategies for teaching “wild” reading. Based on survey responses from over 900 adult readers and classroom feedback, Reading in the Wild offers solid advice and strategies on how to develop, encourage and assess key lifelong reading habits, including dedicating time for reading, planning for future reading, and defining oneself as a reader.

jim trelease

Another NEW professional book that might be of interest to you is Jim Trelease’s, The Read Aloud Handbook, seventh edition.  If you’re like me, his previous editions have been your read aloud “Bible” and go to book.

From the Publisher:  This updated edition of The Read-Aloud Handbook discusses the benefits, the rewards, and the importance of reading aloud to children of a new generation. Supported by delightful anecdotes as well as the latest research (including the good and bad news on digital learning).

NEW Wordless Picture Books

Some incredible wordless picture books have been published this year. These books can be used to support literacy in a variety of ways.

Supporting Emergent & Beginning Readers

While “reading” a wordless picture book children practice literal and inferential messages, evaluate a character’s actions, understand the interrelationship of concepts presented and increase vocabulary.

Develop Story Lines

Wordless picture books or Stories without Words can be used to help children who struggle with story ideas and topics for writing.  Children can be encouraged to create story lines orally and in writing.  Instructional strategies could include:  dialogue, setting development, character descriptions, sequencing of events, and story development.

Here are a few of my NEW favorites:

mr. wufflestortoise and the hareflora flamingojourney.wordlessdaisy gets lost

bluebird

For more information about using, exploring and enjoying wordless picture books go to:  My Little Bookcase

 

Summer Reading – Books with a Sense of Humor

There’s no better way to kick off the summer than by reading a humorous book. Dr. Seuss might have said it best when he said, “I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells.” So, this summer keep on reading and keep those brain cells active!

PICTURE BOOKS WITH A KICK

FUNNY TRANSITIONAL TITLES (beginning chapter books)

MIDDLE-GRADE MALARKEY

NONFICTION THAT WILL MAKE YOU GIGGLE

Source:  http://www.slj.com/2013/05/books-media/collection-development/focus-on-collection-development/humor-that-is-seriousl-funny-focus-on/

ASIJ Elementary Library